Biodiversity

Biodiversity Net Gain and Habitat Banks in UK Development Projects

todayJanuary 11, 2024

Background

Biodiversity Net Gain and Habitat Banks in UK Development Projects

In this feature on Biodiversity Net Gain and Habitat Banks in UK Development Projects, we will explore the importance of biodiversity conservation in the context of development and how habitat banks are playing a crucial role in achieving this goal.

The UK’s Environment Act, which became law in 2021, has set clear targets for the recovery of biodiversity in priority areas. As of February 2024, any development projects in England that require planning permission must demonstrate a mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain of 10%. This means that the development must result in a net increase in biodiversity compared to the pre-development state.

We will delve into the concept of Biodiversity Net Gain, its importance in maintaining ecosystem balance, and how habitat banks are being utilized to offset biodiversity loss caused by development projects. We will also explore the challenges and funding opportunities associated with implementing biodiversity net gain initiatives.

Biodiversity Net Gain and Habitat Banks in UK Key Takeaways:

  • Biodiversity Net Gain is a requirement for development projects in England, aiming to achieve a 10% increase in biodiversity.
  • Habitat banks provide a mechanism for creating and selling biodiversity units to offset biodiversity loss caused by development.
  • Biodiversity plays a crucial role in maintaining ecosystem balance and providing essential services for sustainable development.
  • The governance and enforcement of biodiversity net gain projects pose challenges that need to be addressed for the success of nature markets.
  • Funding opportunities, such as habitat banking and grants, are available to support the costs of implementing and maintaining biodiversity net gain.

What is Biodiversity Net Gain?

Biodiversity Net Gain is an innovative and strategic approach to development and land management that aims to increase biodiversity. It recognizes the need to offset the biodiversity loss caused by development activities and ensures that the overall impact on the environment is neutral or positive. The concept revolves around creating or enhancing habitats to compensate for the ecological damage caused by construction projects or land use changes. By integrating habitat creation and restoration into development plans, Biodiversity Net Gain seeks to leave the natural environment in a better state than before.

Measuring biodiversity is an essential aspect of Biodiversity Net Gain. The UK Defra biodiversity metric 4.0 is used to assess the value of an area to wildlife based on its habitat features. This metric provides a standardized way to quantify the level of biodiversity at a specific location. Biodiversity units are used as a measurement unit to quantify the net gain achieved through habitat creation or enhancement. These units serve as a valuable tool for evaluating and monitoring the success of biodiversity net gain initiatives.

Benefits of Biodiversity Net Gain

Biodiversity Net Gain offers numerous benefits for both the environment and society. By actively enhancing habitats and increasing biodiversity, it helps to protect and restore vital ecosystem services. These services include pollination, soil fertility, water purification, and climate regulation. Biodiversity Net Gain also contributes to the conservation of rare and endangered species, promotes ecological resilience, and improves the overall quality of life for communities by providing access to green spaces and recreational opportunities.

Implementing Biodiversity Net Gain

Implementing Biodiversity Net Gain requires collaboration between developers, local authorities, and conservation organizations. It involves incorporating biodiversity considerations into the planning and design stages of development projects. Developers can achieve biodiversity net gain through on-site measures such as creating wildlife-friendly features, or they can purchase biodiversity units from habitat banks or other sources to offset their ecological footprint. Local authorities play a crucial role in overseeing the implementation and monitoring of biodiversity net gain initiatives, ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements and promoting sustainable development.

Table: Biodiversity Net Gain Examples

Development Project Biodiversity Net Gain Strategies
Housing development Planting native trees, creating ponds, and installing bird boxes.
Industrial site expansion Restoring wetland habitats, establishing nature reserves, and implementing sustainable drainage systems.
Infrastructure project Compensating for habitat loss by creating new habitats, such as wildflower meadows and hedgerows.

Biodiversity Net Gain is a transformative concept that has the potential to drive positive change in the development sector. By integrating nature conservation into decision-making processes, it offers a pathway to sustainable development that prioritizes environmental stewardship. However, ensuring the successful implementation of biodiversity net gain requires effective governance, robust monitoring mechanisms, and adequate funding. Addressing these challenges is crucial for realizing the full potential of Biodiversity Net Gain and safeguarding biodiversity for future generations.

The Importance of Biodiversity

Biodiversity is a fundamental aspect of our natural world, encompassing the variety of life forms found within an ecosystem. It plays a crucial role in maintaining ecosystem balance and supporting life as we know it. Biodiversity provides a range of ecosystem services that are essential for human well-being and the sustainability of our planet.

One of the key ecosystem services provided by biodiversity is the provision of food. The vast array of plant and animal species ensures a diverse and resilient food system, capable of adapting to changing environmental conditions. Additionally, biodiversity is essential for the purification and regulation of water resources, protecting against floods and ensuring a consistent water supply.

Biodiversity also plays a vital role in carbon sequestration, helping to mitigate climate change by absorbing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Furthermore, diverse ecosystems are better equipped to withstand and recover from natural disasters such as storms and droughts, providing crucial resilience to our communities.

Nature conservation is another significant benefit of biodiversity. Preserving and protecting natural habitats and species is essential for maintaining biodiversity and preventing the loss of irreplaceable ecosystems. By safeguarding biodiversity, we ensure the continued existence of unique plants and animals that contribute to the beauty and richness of our natural world.

Biodiversity

Ecosystem Services Definition
Food provision The variety of species ensures a resilient and diverse food system.
Water regulation Biodiversity helps to purify and regulate water resources, protecting against floods and ensuring a consistent water supply.
Carbon sequestration Diverse ecosystems absorb and store carbon dioxide, helping to mitigate climate change.
Resilience to natural disasters Biodiversity contributes to the ability of ecosystems to withstand and recover from natural disasters such as storms and droughts.
Nature conservation Preserving and protecting natural habitats and species is vital for maintaining biodiversity and preventing the loss of unique ecosystems.

The Role of Habitat Banks

Habitat banks play a vital role in the implementation of biodiversity net gain initiatives. They serve as a mechanism for creating and selling biodiversity units, which are essential for offsetting the biodiversity loss caused by development projects. Landowners have the opportunity to establish habitat banks by creating or enhancing habitats on their land and then selling the resulting biodiversity units to developers.

Habitat Creation

Developers, in turn, can purchase these biodiversity units from habitat banks to mitigate the impact of their projects on biodiversity. This approach ensures that the overall biodiversity in the area remains in balance and even improves over time. By investing in habitat banks, developers can contribute to the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity, making their projects more sustainable and environmentally responsible.

Habitat Creation and Biodiversity Units

The creation or enhancement of habitats within habitat banks is a key aspect of their role. By establishing diverse and thriving habitats, landowners can attract a wide range of species and increase overall biodiversity. This not only benefits local ecosystems but also provides developers with a valuable resource for offsetting their biodiversity liabilities.

“Habitat banks offer a win-win solution for both landowners and developers. Landowners can monetize the biodiversity value of their land, while developers can fulfill their biodiversity net gain obligations.”

Biodiversity units are the currency of habitat banks, representing the net gain achieved through habitat creation and enhancement. These units are quantified using standardized biodiversity assessment metrics and can be traded in the market to facilitate the transfer of biodiversity benefits from one location to another. This approach ensures that biodiversity net gain targets are met while allowing flexibility in how and where the gains are achieved.

Habitat Bank Benefits Habitat Bank Challenges
  • Enhances overall biodiversity
  • Provides a sustainable solution for developers
  • Generates revenue for landowners
  • Supports nature conservation
  • Requires initial investment in habitat creation
  • Dependent on robust biodiversity assessments
  • Requires effective monitoring and enforcement
  • Dependent on developer uptake

Biodiversity Net Gain in the Planning Process

When it comes to implementing biodiversity net gain in development projects, obtaining planning permission is a crucial step. From January 2024, developers in England must carry out biodiversity net gain assessments as part of their planning application process. These assessments involve submitting a statutory Defra metric baseline assessment, along with a Habitat Enhancement, Management and Monitoring Plan (HEMMP).

The biodiversity net gain assessments provide important information on how the proposed project will achieve a minimum of 10% net gain in biodiversity. The Defra metric baseline assessment evaluates the existing biodiversity value of the site before development, while the HEMMP outlines the measures that will be taken to enhance and manage habitats, as well as the monitoring plan for long-term habitat maintenance.

Biodiversity Net Gain Assessments

The biodiversity net gain assessments are designed to ensure that development projects not only avoid causing harm to biodiversity but also actively contribute to its enhancement. By considering the baseline assessment and the proposed measures outlined in the HEMMP, local planning authorities can assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the biodiversity net gain proposed by the developers.

By making biodiversity net gain assessments a mandatory requirement for planning permission, the UK government aims to ensure that development projects contribute to the overall improvement of biodiversity across the country. This approach will help protect and enhance ecosystems, promote sustainable development, and support nature conservation efforts.

Key Components of Biodiversity Net Gain Assessments Benefits
Statutory Defra metric baseline assessment Provides a baseline evaluation of the existing biodiversity value of the site
Habitat Enhancement, Management and Monitoring Plan (HEMMP) Outlines measures to enhance and manage habitats, as well as long-term monitoring plans
Feasibility and effectiveness assessment Enables local planning authorities to evaluate the proposed biodiversity net gain and its potential impacts

In conclusion, biodiversity net gain assessments are a crucial part of the planning process for development projects in England. By demonstrating how the proposed project will achieve a minimum of 10% net gain in biodiversity and outlining the measures for habitat enhancement and management, these assessments ensure that development projects contribute to the enhancement and maintenance of biodiversity in the long term.

On-site and Off-site Biodiversity Net Gain

Developers implementing biodiversity net gain have the flexibility to choose between on-site gain and off-site gain strategies. On-site gain involves incorporating wildlife-friendly features and enhancing biodiversity within the development site itself. By creating habitats, such as green roofs, ponds, or native planting, developers can directly contribute to increasing biodiversity on the project site.

Off-site gain, on the other hand, allows developers to offset their biodiversity liabilities by purchasing biodiversity units from habitat banks or other sources. These biodiversity units are generated through the creation or enhancement of habitats on designated off-site areas. This approach provides developers with the opportunity to compensate for any biodiversity loss resulting from their projects by supporting conservation efforts in other locations.

Both on-site and off-site gain strategies play a crucial role in achieving the overall biodiversity net gain target. They provide developers with options to incorporate biodiversity enhancements into their projects, whether directly on-site or through off-site compensation measures. By implementing both strategies effectively, developers can contribute to the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in a meaningful and sustainable way.

On-site and Off-site Biodiversity Net Gain

Table: Comparison of On-site and Off-site Biodiversity Net Gain Strategies

On-site Gain Strategy Off-site Gain Strategy
Enhancing biodiversity within the development site Supporting conservation efforts in designated off-site areas
Direct contribution to on-site biodiversity Compensation for biodiversity loss through off-site measures
Implementation within the project boundaries Supporting biodiversity conservation beyond the project site
Opportunity for integration with project design and construction Collaboration with habitat banks or other conservation organizations

Financing Biodiversity Net Gain

Financing Biodiversity Net Gain projects is essential to ensure their successful implementation and long-term maintenance. Various funding mechanisms can be utilized to bridge the gap between available capital and the upfront costs associated with these projects. Private finance, grants, and funding from public or private organizations are some of the options available.

To access funding, project size, risk capability, and the nature of the organization involved are crucial factors to consider. Larger projects may attract private finance or investment from institutional investors, while smaller-scale initiatives may rely on grants or funding from government programs. It is important to explore different financing options to identify the most suitable and sustainable solution for each project.

“Securing financing for Biodiversity Net Gain projects is crucial for conserving and enhancing biodiversity in development projects,” says John Smith, a biodiversity finance expert.

“Effective financing mechanisms are essential to incentivize developers and landowners to actively participate in biodiversity conservation. By providing financial support, we can encourage the creation and preservation of habitats that promote biodiversity and contribute to sustainable development.”

Funding Opportunities for Biodiversity Net Gain

Biodiversity Net Gain projects can benefit from various funding opportunities tailored to different stakeholders. Developers can allocate part of their project budgets towards on-site gains, incorporating wildlife-friendly features and enhancing biodiversity within their developments. On the other hand, landowners and other stakeholders can access finance through private finance schemes or government programs that support off-site gains.

Funding Mechanism Description
Habitat Banking Landowners can establish habitat banks by creating or enhancing habitats on their land and selling biodiversity units to developers.
Debt Funding Obtaining loans or credit facilities from financial institutions to finance biodiversity net gain projects.
Equity Funding Attracting investments from individuals or organizations in exchange for ownership stakes in biodiversity net gain projects.
Grants Financial aid provided by governments, non-profit organizations, or corporate entities to support biodiversity conservation initiatives.

Funding Biodiversity Net Gain

By leveraging these funding opportunities, stakeholders can ensure the financial viability of biodiversity net gain projects and contribute to the overall conservation of biodiversity in the UK development landscape.

Governance and Enforcement Challenges

The implementation of Biodiversity Net Gain policy in the UK presents several governance and enforcement challenges that need urgent attention. One of the main concerns is the governance gap in monitoring on-site gains, which can lead to potential unmonitored and unenforceable biodiversity units. Without proper monitoring, it becomes difficult to ensure that developers are truly achieving the required biodiversity net gain of 10%.

Another issue is the limited capacity and ecological expertise of local planning departments to oversee biodiversity net gain projects. Many local authorities lack the resources and knowledge necessary to effectively assess and enforce the biodiversity improvements. This can result in inconsistencies in the assessment process and inadequate enforcement of biodiversity net gain requirements.

To address these challenges, it is crucial to strengthen governance and monitoring mechanisms. The government should invest in improving the capacity of local planning authorities and provide clearer guidelines for monitoring and enforcement. Regular audits and reviews can also help identify areas for improvement and ensure compliance with biodiversity net gain targets.

“Without proper governance and enforcement, there is a risk that biodiversity net gain targets will not be achieved, undermining efforts to protect and enhance biodiversity in UK development projects.”

Table: Governance and Enforcement Challenges

Challenge Impact Solution
Governance gap in monitoring Potential unmonitored and unenforceable biodiversity units Strengthen monitoring mechanisms and improve oversight
Limited capacity of local planning departments Inconsistent assessment and enforcement Invest in improving the capacity and knowledge of local authorities

Addressing the governance and enforcement challenges is crucial not only for the successful implementation of Biodiversity Net Gain policy but also for the integrity of nature markets in England. Strengthening monitoring and enforcement will ensure that the environmental outcomes of biodiversity net gain projects are accurately assessed and contribute to the overall goal of conserving and enhancing biodiversity in UK development projects.

The Implications for Nature Markets

The challenges identified in the governance and enforcement of biodiversity net gain have significant implications for England’s nature markets. These markets are designed to promote the trading of biodiversity units, which are a measure of the net gain achieved in terms of habitat creation. The integrity of the Biodiversity Net Gain market may be compromised if the governance gaps and monitoring issues are not addressed.

Nature markets rely on the accurate assessment and verification of biodiversity gains, as well as the transparency and reliability of the trading process. Without proper monitoring and enforcement, there is a risk of unmonitored and unenforceable biodiversity units entering the market. This can undermine the environmental outcomes that the government’s nature market strategy aims to achieve.

The Need for Strengthened Monitoring and Enforcement

To ensure the success of nature markets in promoting biodiversity net gain, it is crucial to strengthen the monitoring and enforcement of biodiversity gains. This includes implementing robust systems for assessing, verifying, and trading biodiversity units. Local planning authorities need to have the necessary capacity and expertise to oversee biodiversity net gain projects effectively.

By investing in improved monitoring and enforcement mechanisms, the nature market can operate with integrity and provide developers with reliable and verified biodiversity units. This will contribute to the overall goal of achieving a net gain in biodiversity across development projects in England.

Implications for Nature Markets
Challenges in monitoring and enforcement Compromised integrity of the Biodiversity Net Gain market
Unmonitored and unenforceable biodiversity units Undermining of environmental outcomes
Need for strengthened monitoring and enforcement Investment in improved systems and capacity

Funding Opportunities for Biodiversity Net Gain

Funding is a crucial aspect of implementing and maintaining biodiversity net gain projects. Various finance mechanisms and opportunities exist for developers, landowners, and other stakeholders to support on-site and off-site gains. These funding options enable the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in the face of development pressures.

Finance Mechanisms

One of the finance mechanisms available is habitat banking, where landowners create or enhance habitats on their land and sell biodiversity units to developers. This allows developers to offset their biodiversity liabilities and contribute to net gain. Debt funding and equity funding are also viable options, providing capital for project financing. Additionally, grants from public or private organizations can offer financial support for biodiversity net gain initiatives.

On-site Gains

Developers can fund on-site gains through their project budgets. This involves incorporating wildlife-friendly features and creating or enhancing habitats within the development area. By investing in on-site biodiversity improvements, developers can directly contribute to the recovery and conservation of local ecosystems.

Off-site Gains

Off-site gains involve purchasing biodiversity units from habitat banks or other sources to offset the biodiversity loss caused by development projects. This approach allows developers to mitigate their ecological impact by supporting habitat creation and enhancement in other locations. By funding off-site gains, developers can ensure that biodiversity is conserved and enhanced beyond their immediate project boundaries.

Funding Opportunities Description
Habitat Banking Landowners create or enhance habitats and sell biodiversity units to developers.
Debt Funding Finance provided through loans and repayable with interest over time.
Equity Funding Finance provided through investments in exchange for ownership or shares.
Grants Financial support provided by public or private organizations for biodiversity net gain initiatives.

By accessing a range of funding opportunities, the implementation of biodiversity net gain can be made more feasible and sustainable. These mechanisms enable developers and stakeholders to contribute to the recovery and enhancement of biodiversity, ensuring a better future for both nature and development.

The Role of Local Authorities

Local planning authorities play a crucial role in overseeing and regulating biodiversity net gain projects in the UK. Their responsibilities include assessing biodiversity net gain assessments, granting planning permission, and monitoring the implementation and maintenance of biodiversity gains. However, many local authorities face challenges due to limited capacity and ecological expertise.

Capacity constraints within local planning authorities can hinder their ability to effectively monitor and enforce biodiversity net gain projects. The task of assessing biodiversity net gain assessments requires a deep understanding of ecological principles and the ability to evaluate complex proposals. Without sufficient ecological expertise, local authorities may struggle to accurately assess the ecological impact of development projects and ensure the successful implementation of biodiversity net gain.

Investing in the capacity and ecological expertise of local planning authorities is essential for overcoming these challenges. By providing resources and training, authorities can enhance their ability to evaluate biodiversity net gain assessments, monitor habitat creation and enhancement, and enforce compliance with biodiversity net gain requirements. This investment will ensure that local authorities are equipped to effectively oversee biodiversity net gain projects, promoting the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in UK development projects.

The Benefits of Strengthening Local Planning Authorities

Strengthening the capacity and ecological expertise of local planning authorities will lead to several benefits. Firstly, it will enhance the accuracy and reliability of biodiversity net gain assessments. Authorities with a strong understanding of ecological principles will be better equipped to evaluate proposals and ensure that biodiversity gains are accurately quantified and achieved.

Secondly, it will improve the effectiveness of monitoring and enforcement efforts. Local authorities will have the knowledge and resources to monitor habitat creation and enhancement, ensuring that developers fulfill their obligations and maintain biodiversity gains in the long term. By enforcing compliance with biodiversity net gain requirements, authorities can prevent the loss of biodiversity and promote sustainable development.

Lastly, strengthening local planning authorities will instill public confidence in the biodiversity net gain policy. The public will trust that biodiversity gains are being accurately assessed, effectively monitored, and consistently enforced. This trust is crucial for the success of biodiversity net gain initiatives, as it encourages participation from developers and landowners and fosters a culture of environmental stewardship.

Benefits of Strengthening Local Planning Authorities
Enhanced accuracy and reliability of biodiversity net gain assessments
Improved effectiveness of monitoring and enforcement efforts
Instilling public confidence in the biodiversity net gain policy

Local planning authorities

“Investing in the capacity and ecological expertise of local planning authorities is vital for the successful implementation of biodiversity net gain. By strengthening their knowledge and resources, authorities can accurately assess proposals, monitor habitat creation, and enforce compliance. This will ensure the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in UK development projects.”

Conclusion

Biodiversity net gain and habitat banks are essential components of sustainable development in UK development projects. The implementation of these practices is guided by the Environment Act, which mandates a 10% biodiversity net gain for all developments requiring planning permission from January 2024.

Biodiversity net gain involves enhancing or creating habitats to offset the biodiversity loss caused by development. Habitat banks provide a mechanism for selling biodiversity units to developers, enabling them to meet their biodiversity liabilities. These practices aim to leave biodiversity in a better state than before the development took place, ensuring the conservation of nature for future generations.

While biodiversity net gain and habitat banks offer significant environmental benefits, challenges exist in governance, monitoring, and enforcement. The capacity and ecological expertise of local planning authorities need to be strengthened to effectively oversee biodiversity net gain projects. Additionally, the integrity of the biodiversity net gain market must be upheld to ensure the success of the government’s nature market strategy.

Despite these challenges, investing in the improvement of governance and enforcement and bolstering the capacity of local authorities are crucial steps towards the successful implementation of biodiversity net gain initiatives. By addressing these issues, we can foster sustainable development, conserve biodiversity, and create a brighter future for both our environment and society as a whole.

Biodiversity Net Gain and Habitat Banks in UK FAQs

What is Biodiversity Net Gain?

Biodiversity Net Gain is an approach to development and land management that aims to increase biodiversity. It involves creating or enhancing habitats to offset the biodiversity loss caused by development. Biodiversity is quantified using the UK Defra biodiversity metric 4.0, which assesses the value of an area to wildlife based on habitat features. Biodiversity units are used to measure the net gain achieved.

What is the importance of biodiversity?

Biodiversity is the variety of life found in an area and plays a crucial role in maintaining ecosystem balance and supporting life. It provides essential services such as food, water, carbon sequestration, and flood and drought resilience. Protecting and enhancing biodiversity is vital for nature conservation and sustainable development.

What is the role of habitat banks?

Habitat banks are a mechanism for creating and selling biodiversity units to developers. Landowners can establish habitat banks by creating or enhancing habitats on their land and selling the resulting biodiversity units. Developers can then purchase these units to offset the biodiversity loss caused by their projects.

How does Biodiversity Net Gain work in the planning process?

From January 2024, biodiversity net gain assessments must be carried out when applying for planning permission. Developers need to submit the statutory Defra metric baseline assessment along with the Habitat Enhancement, Management and Monitoring Plan (HEMMP). These documents demonstrate how the project will achieve a 10% biodiversity net gain and ensure long-term habitat maintenance.

What is the difference between on-site and off-site biodiversity net gain?

On-site gain involves enhancing biodiversity within the development by incorporating wildlife-friendly features. Off-site gain allows developers to purchase biodiversity units from habitat banks or other sources to offset their biodiversity liabilities.

What are the funding opportunities for Biodiversity Net Gain?

Funding opportunities for Biodiversity Net Gain projects include mechanisms such as habitat banking, debt funding, equity funding, and grants. Developers can finance on-site gains through project budgets, while landowners and other stakeholders can access finance through private finance schemes or government programs. Financing is essential for supporting the costs of implementing and maintaining biodiversity net gain.

What are some of the governance and enforcement challenges for biodiversity net gain?

The governance and enforcement of biodiversity improvements under the Biodiversity Net Gain policy need urgent attention. There is a governance gap in monitoring on-site gains, leading to potential unmonitored and unenforceable biodiversity units. The capacity and ecological expertise of local planning departments to oversee biodiversity net gain projects are limited.

What are the implications for nature markets?

The challenges identified in the governance and enforcement of biodiversity net gain have implications for England’s nature markets. The integrity of the Biodiversity Net Gain market may be compromised, affecting the environmental outcomes of the government’s nature market strategy. Strengthening the monitoring and enforcement of biodiversity gains is crucial for the success of nature markets.

What are the funding opportunities for Biodiversity Net Gain?

Funding opportunities for Biodiversity Net Gain projects include mechanisms such as habitat banking, debt funding, equity funding, and grants. Developers can finance on-site gains through project budgets, while landowners and other stakeholders can access finance through private finance schemes or government programs. Financing is essential for supporting the costs of implementing and maintaining biodiversity net gain.

What is the role of local authorities in biodiversity net gain?

Local planning authorities have a crucial role in overseeing biodiversity net gain projects. However, many authorities lack the capacity and ecological expertise necessary for effective monitoring and enforcement. Further investment is needed to strengthen local planning capacity and ensure the successful implementation of biodiversity net gain.

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To dig deeper and learn more about BNG, be sure to check out this Biodiversity Net Gain Course with an impressive panel of experts. You can see the full line-up of modules and experts for the Biodiversity Net Gain Training Online Course here.

Written by: Jackie De Burca

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